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Astronomers Confirm Black Hole At The Centre Of The Milky Way Galaxy, The Mayan Hunab Ku


The shift of ages, the Mayan prophecy of 2012 which speaks about the rare cosmic alignment seems to coincide with what our Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile have recently discovered, a swarm of stars orbiting a vast black hole at the centre of the Milky Way Galaxy ! The ancient Mayan astronomers accurately predicted, over 1500 years ago, the exact alignment of the Earth, the Sun, the star cluster Pleiades and of the center of our Galaxy that will take place at the end of the present long cycle on the Gregorian year 2012. On the Mayan Long Calendar the day designated as 4 Ahau 3 Kankin (13.0.0.0.0) falls on December 21, 2012 and this day will mark "El Fin de los Tiempos" or the end of the long cycle at which time humanity will experience a new beginning. On this day, according to the Mayas and subsequent Meso-American civilizations, the return of Kukulcan (Quetzalcoatl) will take place.

Hunab Ku was, to the Mayas, the supreme God and ultimate Creator. It represented the gateway to other Galaxies beyond our Sun as well as all of the Consciousness that has ever existed in this Galaxy. Hunab Ku, according to the Mayas, is also the Consciousness which organized all matter, from a "whirling disk", into stars, planets and solar systems. Hunab Ku is the "Mother Womb" which is constantly giving birth to new stars and it gave birth to our own Sun and Planet Earth. They also believed that the "Creator" directs everything that happens in our Galaxy from its center through the emanation of periodic "Consciousness Energy" bursts. Today, modern astronomers have verified that at the center of our Galaxy is a "whirling disk" with a "Black Hole" at its center that is both swallowing and giving birth to stars. Could the strange rumblings observed by Dr. Scott Hyman and his associates earlier this year at the center of our Galaxy be connected with what the Mayas believed ?



The black hole, known as Sagittarius A* (pronounced “Sagittarius A-star”), cannot be seen directly, but its nature can be inferred from the pattern of motion of the stars that surround it. Details of the research are published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Reinhard Genzel, of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, who led the international study team, said: “Undoubtedly the most spectacular aspect of our long term study is that it has delivered what is now considered to be the best empirical evidence that supermassive black holes do really exist. The stellar orbits in the galactic centre show that the central mass concentration of four million solar masses must be a black hole, beyond any reasonable doubt.

“The centre of the galaxy is a unique laboratory where we can study the fundamental processes of strong gravity, stellar dynamics and star formation that are of great relevance to all other galactic nuclei, with a level of detail that will never be possible beyond our galaxy.”

His colleague Stefan Gillessen said: “The galactic centre harbours the closest supermassive black hole known. Hence, it is the best place to study black holes in detail.”

The observations have also allowed astronomers to pinpoint the Earth’s distance from the centre of the galaxy with greater precision, measuring it at 27,000 light years. Scientists have also been able to identify common properties among the stellar orbits at the galactic centre.

“The stars in the innermost region are in random orbits, like a swarm of bees,” Dr Gillessen said. “However, further out, six of the 28 stars orbit the black hole in a disc. In this respect the new study has also confirmed explicitly earlier work in which the disc had been found, but only in a statistical sense.

“Ordered motion outside the central light-month, randomly oriented orbits inside - that’s how the dynamics of the young stars in the galactic centre are best described.”



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3 comments:

  1. Anonymous13.1.10

    This is an amazing load of information.

    ReplyDelete
  2. NASA Announces Discovery of Assault by a Black Hole

    Dec. 18, 2007: A powerful jet from a supermassive black hole is blasting a nearby galaxy, according to new data from NASA observatories. This never-before witnessed galactic violence may ha...ve a profound effect on planets in the jet's path and trigger a burst of star birth in its destructive wake.

    This real-life scene, worthy of the most outlandish science fiction, is playing out in a faraway binary galaxy system known as 3C321. Two galaxies are in orbit around one another. A supermassive black hole at the core of the system's larger galaxy is spewing a jet in the direction of its smaller companion.

    "We've seen many jets produced by black holes, but this is the first time we've seen one punch into another galaxy," says Dan Evans, a scientist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and leader of the study. "This jet could be causing all sorts of problems for the smaller galaxy it is pummeling."

    Jets from super massive black holes produce large amounts of radiation, especially high-energy X-rays and gamma-rays, which can be lethal in large quantities. The combined effects of this radiation and particles traveling at almost the speed of light could severely damage the atmospheres of planets lying in the path of the jet. For example, protective layers of ozone in the upper atmosphere of planets could be destroyed.

    The effect of the jet on the companion galaxy is likely to be substantial, because the galaxies in 3C321 are extremely close at a distance of only about 20,000 light years apart. They lie approximately the same distance as Earth is from the center of the Milky Way galaxy....

    * from 2007 but pertinent now in the lead up to 2012 galactic alignment for our Milky Way

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous11.12.12

    Interesting

    ReplyDelete

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